What the New Tax Plan Means to Student Loans in 2018

Sara Lindberg Updated on March 5, 2018

It’s tax season. Do you know how the recent tax bill affects your student loans?

After months of Congressional back and forth, the President signed a massive tax bill in December that includes a $1.5 trillion dollar tax overhaul. If you followed the news at all, you may know that student loans were just one of many political hot potatoes that were potentially going to see big changes with the new bill.

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If you’re a current student with student loans or a former student paying on your student loan debt, you can now breathe a sigh of relief. You escaped some radical changes that were originally on the chopping block.

But before you go back to “business as usual,” it’s a good idea to know what will stay the same under the new bill and what may have changed if some of the proposed changes had passed.

The good news

For the most part, student loans were spared some pretty drastic cuts. This means that taxes on current students remains largely unchanged.

If you have current student loans or are paying back student loan debt, here’s the good news:

  • The student loan interest deduction remains the same. This means that you will still be allowed to claim a deduction of up to $2,500 for the interest you pay on student loans each year. If your modified adjusted gross income is less than $80,000 per year as a single filer, or less than $160,000 as a joint filer, this deduction allows you to save up to $625 per year.
  • Tuition waivers for graduate students will remain tax-free. This is good news if you are a graduate student who teaches or does research in exchange for tuition. Some estimates place the value of that waived tuition as high as $50,000 a year. If this bill had passed, you would have seen your tax bill increase by thousands of dollars.
  • Federal and private student loan debt discharged because of death or disability will not be taxed from 2018 through 2025. Prior to this bill, the IRS treated the amount of the forgiven loan as taxable. But now, the new tax bill excludes student loan debt forgiveness from taxable income if you are permanently disabled. It also excludes forgiveness in the event of death if there is a cosigner on the loan.

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Here’s what could have happened

Even though student loans squeezed through the new bill with very few changes for people with student loan debt, things could have been much different.

The original tax proposal could have been devastating for students and here’s why:

  • Both the House and Senate versions of the bill would have eliminated the ability to deduct the interest paid on your student loan. This amounts to a $2,500 deduction each year.
  • The loss of tax-free tuition waivers for graduate students. An earlier version of the bill passed by the House in November would have taxed that money as income. So, if you are one of the 145,000 graduate students who receive this waiver, you would have been taxed on money you never actually received. This could have raised your tax bill by 400%.
  • If you are receiving tuition assistance from your employer you would have been required to count that as taxable income. This means you would have been taxed at a higher rate. But the new bill leaves this alone and the first $5,250 or employer tuition assistance will remain tax-free.
  • The Lifetime Learning Credit (LLC) was also on the initial cut list, but the final bill keeps this in place. If you are a single filer and make less than $67,000 or you’re married (filing jointly) and make less than $134,000 you are eligible for a tax credit of up to $2,000 per taxpayer for education expenses.

Other changes that impact how you save for college

If you have children and put money in a 529 savings account for their college, you will see a change to the rules on how that money can be used.

The final version of the tax bill expands the use of 529 savings accounts to include expenses for private K-12 education.

Before the tax bill passed, a 529 could only be used for college expenses. But now the money from a 529 can be withdrawn tax-free and used for K-12 private school tuition and college expenses.

This change applies to both new and existing 529 accounts. The final bill also allows you to deposit $10,000 per beneficiary, per year into this account.

You may also be interested in How Student Loans Affect Your Credit. 

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Published in: Refinance

About the Author
Sara Lindberg

Sara Lindberg, B.S., M.Ed., is a freelance writer specializing in business, finance, health, and wellness. She holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in Exercise Science and a Master's Degree in Counseling. When she’s not writing, Sara can be found at the gym lifting weights, running the back roads to train for her next half-marathon, and spending time with her husband and two children. Read more by Sara Lindberg

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